cib self talk

vida mind – mental conditioning – mental training – sport psychology
Australia – Melbourne – Sydney – Adelaide – Canberra – Brisbane

Self-talk is a common potential internal distracter – although it can also be a way to deal with distractions. Anytime you think about something, you are talking to yourself. Self-talk has many potential uses, including breaking bad habits, sustaining effort or acquering skill. Self-talk plays a key role in reactions to situations, and these reactions affect future actions and feelings. Self-talk can take many forms, but is generally categorized in 3 types: positive (motivation), instructional and negative.

Positive self-talk focuses on increasing energy, effort and positive attitude but does not carry any task-related clue (e.g., ‘I can do it’).

Instructional self-talk usually helps individual focus on the technical aspects of performance in order to improve execution (e.g., ‘Bend your knees”).

Negative self-talk is critical and gets in the way of a person’s reaching goals; it is counterproductive and produces anxiety. Saying things like “That was a stupid shot”, “You stink”, or “How can you play so bad?” does not enhance performance or create positive emotions. Rather, it creates anxiety and fosters self-doubt. The performers who think positively about these negative events are usually the most successful.

In addition, instructions such as “Whatever you do, don’t double-fault now,” will typically produce the unwanted behavior. Therefore we should focus on what to do as opposed to what not to do.

If you want to know more about Vida Mind, do a free session with Dr. Damien Lafont. Contact him at info@vidamind.com.au or call 0435 819 262 and he will get in touch with you to schedule 45 min with you either in person or over Skype. In this free info session with him, you’ll go through what is keeping your performing at your best. You’ll know Dr Lafont, how he works and whether you are a good fit for each other.

vida mind – mental conditioning – mental training – sport psychology
Australia – Melbourne – Sydney – Adelaide – Canberra – Brisbane