djokovic let go

vida mind – mental conditioning – mental training – sport psychology
Australia – Melbourne – Sydney – Adelaide – Canberra – Brisbane

To know our body is one of the first steps toward experiencing the Zone. Once aware of his body and confident in his abilities, the athlete may be more detached. This detachment is often expressed by the idea of letting go. When he broke the barrier of the four-minute mile, Roger Bannister was feeling “completely detached.” Some things cannot be enforced. You must release or free yourself and let them occur. We don’t try to fall asleep; we just let go. Similarly, to be successful, you don’t have to consciously try to focus on winning; you just have to be absorbed in the experience. To let go is to finally trust your body, surrendering to the movement, being absorbed by the task, separating from the result and being only in the present. Chris Evert summarizes it well: “It’s that knowledge, that confidence, and also that freedom of just letting go, letting the strokes flow.” And the undisputed master of letting go is Tim Gallwey, author of The Inner Game of Tennis, which says in essence: Knowing when to think and when to let go is the key for tennis at the peak of your potential.

 It’s important in the Zone to stop the continuous monitoring of the quality of our performance—that is, our constant evaluations. Highly trained athlete enters the Zone when motoring does not detect errors for an extended period. One currently undervalued key to understanding the Zone is understanding that the brain and body share a single goal, which is to minimize informational surprise. The brain does it by encoding good models of the situation. The body can move so as to give the brain the inputs it is best able to predict and handle. When we are in the zone, we are doing this so well that no error signal (corresponding to surprise) is being created. When we are in the Zone, no error signal is detected. We must therefore abandon control, to have more . . . control! Paradox? Not really. It’s actually a matter of abandoning conscious and intentional control, and letting the intuitive mind take over. This mind has control over most small muscle movements, and it works the fastest.

see “Back to the Zone – Sport and Inner Experiences” – Dr Damien Lafont

 If you want to improve your performance and to know more about Vida Mind, do a free session with Dr. Damien Lafont. Contact him at info@vidamind.com.au or call 0435 819 262 and he will get in touch with you to schedule 45 min with you either in person or over Skype. In this free info session with him, you’ll go through what is keeping your performing at your best. You’ll know Dr Lafont, how he works and whether you are a good fit for each other.

vida mind – mental conditioning – mental training – sport psychology
Australia – Melbourne – Sydney – Adelaide – Canberra – Brisbane